When Is Evidence of Your Attacker’s Character Admissible In Court?

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Hey folks, During the Zimmerman trial there was considerable consternation among much of the pubic that the trial judge, Debra Nelson, had excluded certain evidence about Trayvon Martin’s past, including his apparent drug use, illegal firearms dealing, passion for “street fighting”, among other pleasant character traits.

Now that the trial has ended in a not guilty verdict Judge Nelson’s evidentiary decisions will never face the scathing reversals they so richly deserve, and I won’t seek to revisit them here. Those decisions do, however, raise some more general evidentiary questions in the context of the law of self-defense. In particular, they raise the question of when, and why, you might be able to introduce into evidence information about the character of the person against whom you used defensive force.

To see my extensive analysis of how character evidence can, and cannot, be introduced into a self-defense trial, take a gander over at my blog post at Legal Insurrection:

When Is Evidence of Your Attacker’s Character Admissible In Court?

In the meantime, don't forget I'm scheduling my fall Law of Self Defense Seminars right now.  If you're interested in attending, or being a hosting group, contact us at seminars@lawofselfdefense.com.

--Andrew, @LawSelfDefense


LOSD2 SEMINAR ALERT

Andrew is currently in the process of planning his Fall 2013 Seminar Tour. This time he'll be traveling from Boston, down the East coast, and then west to East Texas. Planned stops include (1) the Quantico area in Virginia, (2) Columbia, SC, (3) Atlanta, GA, (4) Houston, TX, (5) San Antonio, TX (6) Austin, TX (7) Dallas, TX, then back to Houston and the return trip back to Boston (with similar stops on the way home). Specific dates are being hashed out as I talk with groups interested in hosting seminars, but the trip will definitely be built around the Gun Rights Policy Conference being held in Houston, TX on September 27, 28, 29--so, which I am attending, so plan on the week before and the week after as likely seminar dates. Anyone interested in hosting or attending a seminar anywhere along that route, please contact me directly via the contact form on my blog to get more information.

Andrew F. Branca is an MA lawyer and author of the seminal book “The Law of Self Defense,, 2nd Edition" now available at www.lawofselfdefense.com and also at Amazon.com as either a hardcopy or in Kindle version.

You can follow Andrew on Twitter on @LawSelfDefense and using #LOSD2, on Facebook,, and at his blog, The Law of Self Defense.